new.

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It hurts my heart to watch the news more often than not, so I check up on what’s happening in the world with news sites and apps, and I typically keep my comments to myself but I was watching the Trayvon Martin closing statements today as I waited in the doctor’s office with my mumsi and I had some thoughts.

That’s new, I know!

Anyway, I am a fairly frequent traveller. Not frequent enough to have a boo-thang in the cities that I travel to, and pay for a subscription to the express line at the airport, but frequent enough to have all my liquids in a clear plastic bag, and have my laptop out, my shoes off, and everything out of my pockets without being told at the security check.

Unfortunately, despite being prepared, wearing no jewelry, not smuggling kinder eggs (AHEM.), and following protocol of 3oz liquids (cake frosting, by the way, is considered a liquid) I still am randomly selected for extra screening, bomb-swabbing, or having my meticulously packed bag unpacked at the clumsy hands of a TSA representative 8 out of 10 times that I fly.

And why? A twenty-something young woman poses a threat to national security?

What I’m saying is that like Trayvon Martin, it is because of the color of my skin that someone with very little actual power in the world has tried to have some kind of power over me. And the difference is that I walk away from being searched at the airport annoyed, but alive.

The same cannot be said for Trayvon Martin and for so many like him.

But I don’t think this is a new problem for us, as a society. We are afraid of what is different from us.

“Fear of the unknown. They are afraid of new ideas. They are loaded with prejudices, not based upon anything in reality, but based on… ‘if something is new, I reject it immediately because it’s frightening to me.’ What they do instead is just stay with the familiar. You know, to me, the most beautiful things in all the universe, are the most mysterious.”

I am keeping my thoughts and prayers with the family who lost their 17-year-old son, because I don’t know that I can tell you what ‘justice’ means, but I can tell you that Trayvon Martin doesn’t have the opportunity to go to college, have a family, fall in love, and that there are parents out there that had to bury their child.

Love, B

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